Bible Questions

Bible Questions

What is the Lord's Supper?

The Lord's Supper is the symbolic meal that Christ established and commanded; in which Christians remember Christ's sacrifice continually; in which they acknowledge their sharing in the benefits of His death; at which they have fellowship with Christ and with other Christians; and make their thanksgiving to God.

The Lord's Supper is a symbolic meal.

The Lord's Supper is a proclamation of the Lord's death by words and symbols (1 Corinthians 11:26).

Christ's body is represented by the bread (1 Corinthians 11:24).

Christ's blood is represented by the wine (1 Corinthians 11:25).

The bread is broken and the wine is poured out as symbols of Christ's death upon the Cross (Matthew 26:26; Mark 14:22; Luke 22:19, 20; 1 Corinthians 11:24, 25).

Both the bread and the wine are to be distributed to Christians as they sit at the Lord's Table (Matthew 26:26, 27; Mark 14:22-28; Luke 22:19, 20; 1 Corinthians 11:23, 24, 26).

The Lord's Supper was prepared for, in symbol, by the Jewish Passover (1 Corinthians 5:7, 8; Exodus 12:21-28): even as the Passover proclaimed the mercy of God in redeeming His people under the old covenant, so the Lord's Supper proclaims God's redeeming mercy under the new covenant (1 Corinthians 1 1:26).

Christians who take part in the Lord's Supper should be willing to dedicate themselves completely to Christ

The Lord's Supper took place at the Passover feast and was established according to the pattern of the Passover (Matthew 26:17-19; Mark 14:1, 2, 12-16; Luke 22:14-20; John 13:21-30; compare Exodus 12).

The bread that was eaten with the lamb in the Passover feast was put to a new use (Matthew 26:26).

The third cup of the Passover, 'the cup of blessing' (compare 1 Corinthians 10:16) was also put to a new use (Matthew 26:27, 28).

By reason of its significance, the Lord's Supper must be regarded as quite distinct from all other meals (1 Corinthians 11:29).

The Lord's Supper was established and commanded by Christ.

The Lord Jesus Christ established it at the Passover meal with His disciples on the night of His betrayal (Matthew 26:26-28; 1 Corinthians 11:23).

Christ gave certain actions to be imitated every time the symbolic meal is repeated (1 Corinthians 11:23ff).

The Lord's Supper, in its institution, was a meal that Christ earnestly desired to share with His disciples (Luke 22:15).

In establishing the symbolic meal Christ commanded that it should be regularly repeated (Luke 22:19; 1 Corinthians 11:25).

Because Christ established the meal it is called the Lord's Supper (1 Corinthians 11:20), and the table of the Lord (1 Corinthians 10:21). It is described as the breaking of bread (Acts 2:42; 20:7) because Christ broke the bread (Luke 22:19; 24:30, 35). It is also called the 'eucharist' or 'thanksgiving' (1 Corinthians 10:16) because Christ gave thanks when He took the cup (Matthew 26:27).

The apostle Paul received a direct revelation from the Lord Jesus Christ regarding the institution of the Lord's Supper and the importance of its continuance and repetition (1 Corinthians 11:23; compared with Galations 1:12; 2:2).

We are not surprised, therefore, that the Lord's Supper was a regular act of the early Church (Acts 2:42); they used to assemble on the first day of the week for the breaking of bread (Acts 20:7).

By means of the Lord's Supper Christians remember Christ's sacrifice continually.

The Lord's Supper sets forth Christ's death for us (1 Corinthians 11:26).

The purpose is that we should recall to mind Christ's sufferings on our behalf (Luke 22:19; 1 Corinthians 11:24, 25).

It is a remembrance, or a memorial, meal (1 Corinthians 11:23-25).

By means of the Lord's Supper Christians acknowledge their sharing in the benefits of Christ's death.

The Lord's Supper declares that the new covenant that God promised has been established through the saving work of His Son (1 Corinthians 11:25).

It reminds us of our sharing by faith in the benefits of His death (John 6:53, 63; 1 Corinthians 10:16).

The Lord's Supper is a symbol of our sharing or partaking of Christ (1 Corinthians 10:17).

In the Lord's Supper Christians have fellowship with Christ and with other Christians.

The Lord's Supper is an act of communion with Christ (1 Corinthians 10:16).

Christians, therefore, who take part in the Lord's Supper should be in uncompromised fellowship with the Lord Jesus Christ (1 Corinthians 10:21).

The Lord's Supper is an act of fellowship with other Christians: it is the time when Christians 'come together' (1 Corinthians 11:17, 18, 20, 33, 34; 1 Corinthians 10:17; Acts 20:7).

The Lord's Supper expresses the union of Christians with one another (1 Corinthians 10:17; 12:13).

The fellowship which believers have with the Lord Jesus Christ in the Lord's Supper is a pledge of the fulfilled fellowship they will have in the kingdom of God (Mark 14:25; Luke 22:16).

In the Lord's Supper Christians make their thanksgiving to God.

The Lord's Supper is a reminder of the death of Christ to bring forth our thanksgiving (1 Corinthians 11:24, 25).

We are to give thanks for the bread and wine as Christ did, remembering that they are symbols of His broken body and His outpoured blood (1 Corinthians 11:23, 24).

Thus the Lord's Supper is the particular time when we offer our thanksgiving to God for Christ and His redeeming work (1 Corinthians 10:16).

Being more aware of God's mercies towards us at the Lord's Supper than at any other time, the sacrifice of thanksgiving should include the offering of ourselves to God (Romans 12:1).

Christians who take part in the Lord's Supper should be willing to dedicate themselves completely to Christ (1 Corinthians 10:21).

To take part properly in the Lord's Supper we need to have done with our old kind of life and to be living to the full our new life in Christ (1 Corinthians 5:7, 8): renewed dedication of ourselves to this end is part of our thanksgiving.

The Lord's Supper is a tremendous help to the spiritual life of Christians.

The Lord's Supper strengthens our faith and refreshes our souls - this fact is true every time we consider the love of God to us (Romans 8:35-39; 1 John 3:1-3).

At the Lord's Supper we may feed spiritually upon Christ (John 6:32, 33, 35, 50, 51): those who rightly receive the bread and the wine, by living faith, receive Christ and the benefits of His death (1 Corinthians 10:16).

Unfortunately, it is possible for Christians to take part in the Lord's Supper unworthily.

The Lord's Supper needs to be entered upon with care (1 Corinthians 1 1:27).

Christians should examine their lives before they eat their share of the bread and drink of the cup (1 Corinthians 11:28).

The Lord's Supper is to be continued until Christ returns.

The Lord's Supper looks forward to our Lord Jesus Christ's return (1 Corinthians 11:26).

The Lord's Supper will no longer be necessary when He returns (1 Corinthians 11:26).